how do I store .avi files off-site (not on Hard Drive)?

posted in General, viewed 7952 times

I have several hours of raw footage, as .avi files. (All sorts of subject matter, some crap, some potentially good stuff, some I may use for future projects etc.) My hard drive is nearly full, I thought I was going to store these files on DVD’s, but I see now, that you can not simply transfer an .avi file from your HD to a disk - you need to convert it to another type of file.

So, in order to store .avi files as .avi files (so I can use them, edit them, etc.) do I need to purchase another hard drive, (an external HD)?

How does everyone else deal with all their raw footage?

Thank you,

pekoe reply

Feedback
09-07-2007 11:41 AM
pekoe

pekoe wrote:
I have several hours of raw footage, as .avi files. (All sorts of subject matter, some crap, some potentially good stuff, some I may use for future projects etc.) My hard drive is nearly full, I thought I was going to store these files on DVD’s, but I see now, that you can not simply transfer an .avi file from your HD to a disk - you need to convert it to another type of file.

So, in order to store .avi files as .avi files (so I can use them, edit them, etc.) do I need to purchase another hard drive, (an external HD)?

How does everyone else deal with all their raw footage?

Thank you,

pekoe

What did you capture them on? Why not burn a data DVD with the AVI’s instead of a movie DVD? (Unless you absolutely need to read it in a standalone DVD player) reply

Feedback
09-07-2007 05:08 PM
carrot

OK, so here is my stupidity showing...

Are you suggesting that all the info I read about having to transfer .avi files to something else before burning to DVD was just to allow them to be read by a stand-alone DVD player?

I only want to be able to access them again on my computer.

I shot on miniDV tape, I captured them onto my hard drive using Pinnacle Studio.

So, are you saying I should be able to just burn the .avi files onto a DVD using, say, Nero’s “data disc” option? reply

Feedback
09-07-2007 06:17 PM
pekoe

Short answer: yes

Long answer with commentary: I was baffled several years ago when I heard something like 90% of CD-R’s being sold were used to make audio CD’s (the kind sold in stores with about 15 songs a piece...). If you use MP3 (for example) you can store a hundred or more songs on one CD. And the data you can store is even more: programs, pictures, movies, etc. Portable MP3 players and iPods may have killed audio CD’s though, fortunately.
Then recordable DVD’s came out, and everyone wants to convert the movies they downloaded off the web to DVD so they can put it in their standalone DVD player. Again I thought that was dumb because
1. When the original 4.3GB DVD was ripped and converted to DivX or Xvid or whatever so it can fit on a 700MB CD, it was done to save space and time (takes less time to transfer 700 MB than 4 GB). The loss of quality was negligible, and the gain in space was great. Moreever computer monitors had higher resolutions than TV’s and were more convenient for displaying the digital data off the DVD’s or CD’s.
2. You’re wasting time reconverting to DVD. You’re also losing some quality every time you make a conversion like that.
The excuse I hear the most on DVD burning forums was that it was more “comfortable” to lie on the couch and watch the TV than sit on a chair and watch the movie off the computer screen!
Lazy bastards!
Finally a workaround came out and it was DivX-certified DVD players. In addition to playing regular DVD’s, those can play data CD’s if the video is encoded in the DivX (and sometimes Xvid) codec. You can burn to a 700 MB CD-R AND lay on your lazy butt on the couch... (Of course you STILL have to do some converting if the movie wasn’t in DivX or Xvid.)

I think people are just lazy. And to feed their laziness they make more work for themselves...

But yeah, if you’ve got videos and you don’t need to play them on your DVD player, just burn them as data CD’s or DVD’s! It’s very convenient if you have some fancy container/codec because converting can be a pain then. There’s no conversion, no loss of quality. And you can watch them again at any time on any computer (so long as it has the codec), even away from home or the couch! reply

Feedback
09-09-2007 12:15 AM
carrot

Well, Carrot, thank you so much for your time and effort in responding. That was very informative.


Pekoe (just noticed we’re both orange ... orange carrot, oragne pekoe ) reply

Feedback
09-09-2007 01:43 PM
pekoe

I just want to chip in that storing data on harddrives for years and years is not a good idea. At least unless you 'refresh' the data from time to time, i.e. copy the files off and back onto the hardrive.

Like other magnetic media such as tape, the data on the harddisk will deteriorate over time. Noise will be introduced and corrupt your files, rendering them unreadable.

so how long does data on a harddisk last?

I had a large library of sound files that I copied to a harddisk in 2001 or 2002 and tried to read back today (2008) without luck. Most of the files cannot be read now after 6 years of storage.

Optical media - CD, DVD etc - are a lot more robust. I don’t think it has been around long enough for anyone to actually know for sure how long they last. Some say a 100 years. we will see. reply

Feedback
07-12-2008 05:01 PM
chris jones

(to chris jones)
Actually it turns out optical media isn’t as robust as they thought it was either. I think when they said it would last 20 to 100 years, they meant hard-pressed CD’s and DVD’s (the ones with the aluminum layer). Seems the crystal used in recordable and rewritable media, in addition to being sensitive to heat and sunlight, may degrade faster over time than previously thought. Also with all the outsourcing, you can’t be 100% sure of the quality of the manufactured media.
See these articles
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD-R#Expected_lifespan
http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/CD-Recordable-discs-unreadable-in-less-than-two-years.html

Surely they’re still better than magnetic hard disks, because they’re not sensitive to shocks or magnetic fields, and there’s little mechanical wear since it’s a laser beam (though I do wonder if it can affect the crystals). I wouldn’t bet my life on them though.

Conclusion: Backing up or archiving to CD-R and DVD+/-R is good, but it’s not a bad idea to check every couple of years through your batch of media that they’re still readable, and to reburn any suspicious media. And beware of hard disks, they can sometimes fail without notice (probably the scariest part - whereas with optical media it tends to be gradual). reply

Feedback
07-30-2008 02:14 AM
anonymous
1,580 posts

I believe you should keep your original AVI files, despite their 12 GB per hour size. Get yourself two large and mirrored hard drives (only a couple hundred bucks?) and dump everything from tape, which will become your third back up. I do not buy this negligible quality loss claim. Keep every original pixel to be sure. On the other hand I do think JPG looks every bit good as stoopid enormous TIFF files ... reply

Feedback
01-01-2010 01:19 PM
gordnog

Reply

Topic
Your reply
Your name
or log in
Verify you're human

By submitting this form you agree to our posting rules,
privacy policy and our disclaimer.