2TB of Files to convert

posted in Encoding, viewed 3103 times

Hi,

I need to convert almost 2TB of files (from mpeg 1/2 to mp4)

I have linux and windows machine. I need to know which is the best software or solution to have these files converted at good quality?

I can on the computer 24 hours, which one will not hang?

Please advice.

Thank You reply

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03-15-2009 10:00 PM
erictham
6 posts

iSkysoft can help you.
It support batch conversion. :-)
www.iskysoft.com reply

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03-15-2009 10:55 PM
drymartine
80 posts

It looks like something for mac on that?

I need to use either windows/linux... something not so commercial.. more professional... 2tb of files man :) reply

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03-15-2009 11:35 PM
erictham
6 posts

You could try RipBot264.
I think there’s a batch mode to convert multiple files.
I’d recommend opening your computer case, and aiming a fan dead at the CPU. It’s bound to heat up, so better be safe than sorry. reply

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03-16-2009 10:21 AM
carrot

Right, any others? still looks like a development program to me. May not be that stable?

Please , anyone, i need a good and stable and professional software (window/linux) to do the conversation.

Help :) reply

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03-16-2009 09:37 PM
erictham
6 posts

Does it means the higher the cpu i buy, the faster i can get things done? (with a super fan of cause.

Will it be better to have machines that have hyper treading or dual/qua cpu ?

Should i run 2 software at one time if i have hyer treading? Or it will still be the same?

carrot wrote:
You could try RipBot264.
I think there’s a batch mode to convert multiple files.
I’d recommend opening your computer case, and aiming a fan dead at the CPU. It’s bound to heat up, so better be safe than sorry.

reply

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03-16-2009 10:04 PM
erictham
6 posts

http://www.networkedmediatank.com/showthread.php?tid=10513
suggests ripbot264 does in fact take advantage of all CPU cores.
for details, read the documentation to find out how well it takes advantage of hyperthreading and multiple cores. sometimes the settings will have a control that lets you adjust how many concurrent threads you have running, or to turn on the use of multiple processors or hyperthreading, and many programs detect it automatically anyway. it’s always possible the odd program doesn’t support multiple processors, and if that’s the case run multiple instances of it simultaneously. as i said, check the documentation.
thought: if it’s also able to take advantage of the GPU (some video encoding programs can offload some of the work to the graphics card now), you can try to check that setting too

just because a program is open source doesn’t mean it’s non-functional. open-source projects get tweaked and improved all the time, and sure they have bugs (professional programs too right?). There’s no question that x264 (open-source) is hands-down the best h.264 implementation right now. it’s used in many open-source encoders (actually front-ends (meaning user interfaces - like megui or ripbot264 - x264 is actually a single command-line executable)).
The tool of choice to do h264 encoding is megui (I presume you’re encoding to h264/mp4, as opposed to mpeg-4 part 2/mp4), but it can be hard to figure out. i put ripbot264 because it’s a click-and-forget program. reply

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03-17-2009 03:20 PM
carrot

I can’t seems to find where the documentation file are. I also not sure if multiple processors or hyperthreading helps. reply

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03-18-2009 04:32 AM
erictham
6 posts

Well just take it for a test drive on a sample file (that has good representation on the average amount of motion and resolution of the movies). Then divide the time it took to encode by the duration of the movie, and multiply the duration of the all files to encode to get an approximate ETA. reply

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03-18-2009 09:01 AM
carrot

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